June: The Architecturally Macabre Book Club

June: The Architecturally Macabre Book Club

WHERE ARCHITECTURE IS ALWAYS THE MAIN CHARACTER.

Hosted by AFSB Vice President, Selinda Tuttle.

“Personally, I prefer to read books—fiction or non-fiction—that feature the city as a character,” says the book club’s curator, AFSB Vice President Selinda Tuttle. “The only thing cooler than reading a book that reckons with a city is being able to talk about that book with people who find it just as worthy of conversation.”

 
June’s Book:
Loving Frank
by Nancy Horan
 

Register through Eventbrite below to automatically get the ZOOM link for June’s book club meeting. 

 
Join the private Facebook group (same name) to interact with more book lovers!

Happy Reading!

A Summer Lecture Series: The Architecture of India

A Summer Lecture Series: The Architecture of India

By Dr. Allan Langdale

Thursdays, Via Zoom.
June 17 - August 19, from 6:45 - 8:00 PM

$10/lecture or $80 for all

This lecture series focuses on several monuments and architectural complexes in India, surveying the Buddhist, Hindu, and Islamic traditions of the sub-continent. The material will be presented in chronological order, spanning dates from the 2nd century BCE to the sixteenth century.

Read more about each individual lecture on our Events Page.


 

Allan Langdale has had seasons of powerful lectures with the Architectural Foundation of Santa Barbara, including several sold-out lectures. He has his PhD in art history from UCSB and currently teaches at UC Santa Cruz. He also works in the tourism industry for Smithsonian Journeys and Zegrahm Expeditions, doing about a dozen trips a year. Allan is the author of several articles and books, including Palermo: Travels in the City of Happiness (2014) and The Hippodrome of Istanbul / Constantinople (2020). His travel blog can be found at ‘Allan’s Art and Architecture Worlds’: https://allansartworlds.sites.ucsc.edu/

Beauty Out Of Ashes by Sophia Beccue

Beauty Out Of Ashes by Sophia Beccue

May 15 – July 8, 2021
Architectural Foundation of Santa Barbara Gallery

The Architectural Foundation of Santa Barbara is pleased to announce Beauty Out of Ashes, an exhibition of vibrant, abstract paintings by Sophia Beccue. Visitors are invited to view the exhibition on Saturdays, from 1:00 to 4:00 pm, and weekdays by appointment, May 15th through July 8th. The artist will be present on May 15 and July 3. (Self-screening, masks, and social distancing are required.)

During the past two years, while living through cancer and a global pandemic, Sophia Beccue came to grasp the deeper meaning of beauty, beauty born out of the dark times, experienced personally and collectively.

In December 2018, Beccue was diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer; in 2019, she went into partial remission and long-term treatment. After wrestling through the meaning of life and death, and finding peace through her faith, she was better equipped to face the pandemic and her husband’s diagnosis of cancer. She discovered not only beauty in the darkness, but strength in the midst of weakness and brokenness.

Her paintings are predominantly abstract, done in watercolor and acrylics on paper and wood panels. The emotion-packed journey through cancer inspired Beccue to put her heart into her work with a calm spirit. Her dynamic compositions, suffused with color, movement and texture, capture deep valleys as well as sunshine with authenticity.

Born in Taiwan, Beccue immigrated to the U.S. in her teens and currently lives in Santa Barbara. She studied graphic design at San Diego State University and illustration at the Academy of Art in San Francisco. She worked as a graphic designer and illustrator, and now focuses on fine art painting. A member of the Santa Barbara Art Association, the Abstract Art Collective, and the Art Council of the Westmont-Ridley Tree Museum of Art, she has won numerous awards and has had solo and group exhibitions. Her art has been collected internationally.

The Architectural Foundation of Santa Barbara has been dedicated to expanding our community’s appreciation of the built environment since 1983. The AFSB Gallery is located in the historic Acheson House at the corner of Garden and East Victoria Streets in Santa Barbara. Regular gallery hours are Saturdays from 1:00 to 4:00 pm and weekdays by appointment.

https://www.sophiabeccuestudio.com/

May: The Architecturally Macabre Book Club

May: The Architecturally Macabre Book Club

WHERE ARCHITECTURE IS ALWAYS THE MAIN CHARACTER.

Hosted by AFSB Vice President, Selinda Tuttle.

“Personally, I prefer to read books—fiction or non-fiction—that feature the city as a character,” says the book club’s curator, AFSB Vice President Selinda Tuttle. “The only thing cooler than reading a book that reckons with a city is being able to talk about that book with people who find it just as worthy of conversation.”

 
May’s Book:
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
by John Berendt
 

Register through Eventbrite below to automatically get the ZOOM link for May’s book club meeting. 
 
Join the private Facebook group (same name) to interact with more book lovers!

Happy Reading!

Kids Draw Architecture 2021 / Niños Dibujan Arquitectura 2021

Annual Sketch Sessions are back. Sketch Your Communities 2021!

Send us your drawings if you’d like them to be considered for our 2022 calendar. Tag us on Facebook. Email them to info@afsb.org.
Mail or drop them off at our office 229 E. Victoria Street.

Deadline: Wednesday, June 2

More information is in KDA’s page in the Education tab.

The Architecturally Macabre Book Club

NEW EVENT: The Architecturally Macabre Book Club

WHERE ARCHITECTURE IS ALWAYS THE MAIN CHARACTER.

Hosted by AFSB Vice President, Selinda Tuttle.

“Personally, I prefer to read books—fiction or non-fiction—that feature the city as a character,” says the book club’s curator, AFSB Vice President Selinda Tuttle. “The only thing cooler than reading a book that reckons with a city is being able to talk about that book with people who find it just as worthy of conversation.”

HSDC Winners for 2021!

We are proud to announce the winners of this year’s competition!

* names match from left to right*

Jack Van Thyne, a junior at San Marcos High, won first place.

Susy Lopez, a freshman at Dos Pueblos High, won second place.

Olivia Doman, a junior from Santa Ynez Valley High, won third place.

Ellie Gleason, a sophomore at Dos Pueblos High, was awarded Honorable Mention.

Rachel Lin, a senior at Dos Pueblos High, was awarded Honorable Mention.

Congratulations on all who participated! It was a joy to have this competition despite the complications due to Covid-19 and we look forward to another year of the High School Design Competition!

For more details, visit our High School Design Competition Page through the Education tab to read a featured article on EdHat.

Impossible Objects: Screen Prints by Ed Lister

MM Rainbow by Ed Lister

Impossible Objects: Screen Prints by Ed Lister

March 13 – May 8, 2021
Architectural Foundation of Santa Barbara Gallery

MM Rainbow by Ed Lister

The AFSB Art Gallery at the Architectural Foundation of Santa Barbara is pleased to announce the opening of Impossible Objects, an exhibition of vibrant, abstract silkscreen prints, or serigraphs, by Ed Lister.  

Visitors are invited to view the exhibition on Saturdays, from 1:00 to 4:00 pm, March 13 through May 8, 2021, and weekdays by appointment (call 805-965-6307).  The artist will be present on the first and last days of the exhibition,  March 13 & May 6.  (Self-screening, masks, and social distancing are required.)

Ed Lister, known in Los Angeles and Santa Barbara as a skilled scenic artist, created this series of “impossible objects” in the early 1970s while teaching printmaking at the Chelsea School of Art in London.  After teaching art for twelve years, Lister moved to California.  Starting in the mid-70s he worked for ten years as the lead scenic artist for the Center Theatre Group at the Taper and Ahmanson Theaters in Los Angeles. Subsequently, he painted backdrops and installations as wide as 400 feet for TV, movies, and destination resorts, hotels, and casinos.   

More recently Lister was commissioned to paint a 60 feet-wide mural encircling the Bisno Schall Clock Gallery of the Santa Barbara Courthouse that depicts our perception of time and various ways of recording it (http://www.bisnoschallgallery.com).  Although he loved working on such a large scale, Lister now paints more modest-sized images concerned with iridescent and reflective seascapes and skies. 

Created fifty years ago, these striking, hand-pulled prints play with our contemporary sensibilities and logical brains in their resemblances to imaginative digital images. Of all the printing techniques, Lister most relished executing screened images with areas of pure color put down in a clean and direct manner.  In this series, he created improbable, mind-bending objects that cannot exist other than on a flat surface.  Intrigued by their bold colors and shapes, our eyes are lured in, then our assumptions of reality are challenged.

The Architectural Foundation of Santa Barbara has been dedicated to expanding our community’s appreciation of the built environment since 1983. The AFSB Gallery is located in the historic Acheson House at the corner of Garden and East Victoria Streets in Santa Barbara. Regular gallery hours are Saturdays from 1:00 to 4:00 pm and weekdays by appointment.

Story Time: Ellwood Station

Last chance of the year to see Patrick McGinnis' Exhibition!

Saturday, December 19, from 1 – 4 PM at the AFSB Art Gallery

Hear him tell stories about the locations of his photo series like this one about …

Ellwood Station

 Over the past several years, I noticed old industrial structures off the right side of the southbound 101 freeway. It was fenced off and shrouded by trees, obviously non-operational. No one at the end of Ellwood Station Road seemed to have contact or know much about the fenced off structures. Though I knew it would prove a challenge to photograph, I was intrigued all the same.


     A few years later, driving the same route on the 101 South, I glanced over and was delighted to see that many of the trees were gone! Making a split-second decision, I exited the freeway and circled back to the end of the road. This time, there was someone on the property. Much to my delight, this person turned out to be the owner! We discussed the structures and his plans to demolish them and clear the site in preparation for future projects. He graciously granted me access to the property and permission to photograph the facilities until they were gone.

     Ellwood Station was a large concrete plant owned by Vulcan Materials. Located on the rail line, it provided large quantities of concrete for much of the Santa Barbara and Goleta area construction projects. The “Ellwood Station Series” photography project took several months. But eventually, the structures were torn down, vanishing one by one, cut apart by large metal shears. Reduced to pieces of scrap steel, they were loaded onto large trucks and taken to a recycling facility in Los Angeles.

     The once fenced-off site along the railroad line was cleaned up and made ready for the next project, yet to be determined. Ellwood station no more than a memory is now preserved through my photographs, presented to you in this exhibition, “Historic Preservation Series.”